Corona-Related E-Learning Latin Instruction
 
 
Contact information for Magister Perkins (sperkins@msdwt.k12.in.us)
 
 
Office hours by email:  M, W, F 9:30-10:30 a.m.; 1:30-2:30 p.m.
T, Th 11:00-11:30 a.m; 1:30-2:00 p.m.
 
Office hours by Zoom
 
Day Time Meeting ID Required Password
Tuesday 1:00-1:30

284-290-122

608882
Tuesday 2:00-2:30

373-343-985

629990
Thursday

10:30-11:00

227-621-700

391729

Thursday 

11:30-noon

917-255-716

104402

 
Imp
 
* It is important that you visit this page each Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday to check for updates. *
 
 
 
Special Video Message from Magister Perkins and Magister Rodney
 
 
 
Latin I

The Romans told many stories that are famous even today.  In this collection you will find both mythological and historical tales.  If you need help with vocabulary, you can find an online dictionary here.  Completed work should be emailed to me on or before the due date.

Link to Story Packet Story Date Due
Here Europa May 1
  Tarpeia May 1
  Atalanta May 1
  Pandora May 8
  Alcestis May 8
  Actaeon May 8
  Horatii/Curiatii May 15
  Coriolanus May 15
  Cincinnatus May 15

 


 
Latin II
 
We continue our exploration of ancient Greek culture with a look at one of the greatest stories and poems of all time, Homer's Iliad.  In the 18th century, a man named Samuel Clarke translated the Greek epic poem into Latin, and you will be reading selections from that Latin work.  To begin, you will need to watch and take notes on my introductory video.  Each week you will then need to do the following three things:
 
  1. Watch and take notes on my videos that go with the assigned sections.
  2. Translate the assigned sections.
  3. Send me ONE copy of your translations with each section clearly labeled.
Special note:  You can find an online Latin dictionary here.
 
 
Text of Latin Iliad Translation Assignment Video Link Date Due By
here   Intro video  
  I.1-5 here 4/24
  I.11-16 here 4/24
  I.17-21 here 4/24
  I.26-30 here 5/1
  I.118-123 here 5/1
  I.133-138 here 5/1
  I.148-151, 169-171 here 5/8
  XVI.684-688 here 5/8
  XVI.733-739 here 5/8
  XVI.740-743, 755-756 here 5/15
  XVI.818-821 here 5/15
  XXII.260-267, 270-272 here 5/15
  XXII.317-327 here 5/21

 

 
Latin III
 
You will begin your study of the Roman philosopher Seneca.  It is important that you watch my video introduction to Seneca and take notes in the history/culture section of your notebook.  You may purchase the book or download the text for free at the links below.  Translate each epistle and then watch the discussion video.  Make corrections based on the video and then email your translations to me on or before the due date.  *Be sure to check here each Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday for updates.  I will be updating links to the discussion videos.* 
 
***Thinking ahead:  When you have finished the last epistle, you will need to write a philosophical letter of your own.  It should be one page, typed, and addressed to a friend of yours.  In it you must reference one of the epistles from Seneca that we have read and a) explain to your friend why that one meant something special to you and b) how you will apply its advice in your own life.
 
 
Intro Video Link Text Links Epistle to Translate

Date Due By

Discussion Videos

here Hardback book I April 10 Epistle I
  PDF II April 10 Epistle II
    VII April 10 Epistle VII
    XI April 17 Epistle XI
    XI April 17  
    XX April 17 Epistle XX
    XIII April 24 Epistle XIII
    XIII April 24  
    XXIII April 24 Epistle XXIII
    XXVIII May 1 Epistle XXVIII
    XXXIII May 1 Epistle XXXIII
    XXXIII May 1  
    XXXVIII May 8 Epistle XXXVIII
    XLIV May 8 Epistle XLIV
    LII May 8 Epistle LII
    LXII May 15 Epistle LXII
    LXXI May 15 Epistle LXXI
    LXXXI May 15 Epistle LXXXI
    Personal epistle May 21  

***Thinking ahead:  When you have finished the last epistle, you will need to write a philosophical letter of your own.  It should be one page, typed, and addressed to a friend of yours.  In it you must reference one of the epistles from Seneca that we have read and a) explain to your friend why that one meant something special to you and b) how you will apply its advice in your own life.

 

Latin IV
 
Whether or not you are preparing for the AP Latin exam, it is important that we finish our reading of Caesar.  If you have your workbooks, you may complete assignments in them.  If not, click on the link in the following table.  You may work at your own pace, but should complete one chapter per week.  *You MUST see me during my Zoom office hours at least once a week to touch base on your work.*
 
For those who ARE taking the AP exam, I HIGHLY RECOMMEND that you watch the AP Latin Online Review Sessions when you get to Book VI (Chapter 21 in the workbook).  The archived livestreams are available here, and I would also suggest that you subscribe to that YouTube channel.  The sessions are hosted by Magistra Luongo, whom my wife and I knew when we were teaching in Texas, and Magister Johnson, who has excellent Latin grammar review videos and is a resident of Maine, just like our own Magister Rodney.
 
Week Caesar Workbook Chapter
April 6-10 Chapter 8
April 13-17 Chapter 9
April 20-24 Chapter 21
April 27-May 1 Chapter 22
May 4-8 Chapter 23
May 11-15 Chapter 24
May 18-21 See me during a Zoom time

 

 
Latin V
 
You have the opportunity to explore something incredibly timely...the plague of Athens in 430 B.C.  You are currently experiencing something very similar to what the Athenians did nearly 2500 years ago.  Work at your own pace, but all work should be completed by April 30.  With the project, you will want to work together, but obviously not in person.